Editorial Comment: Stop it prophets!

A self-styled Buhera prophet was this week sentenced to 18 years in jail for sodomising a follower.Maxwell Charamba, 43, of Buhera under Chief Makumbe denied sodomy charges when he appeared before magistrate Livingstone Chipadza and was convicted due to the overwhelming evidence.

In his defence, Charamba blamed the devil.
a�?Your Worship, I was overpowered by the devil and could not control myself,a�? he said.

Charamba will however, serve an effective 15-year jail term after the court suspended three years.
You see, that is where the problem is, a�?blame it on the devila�?. There is a sad heritage to do with Christianity in society.A� Prophecy has been and continues to be abused by apostates, spiritualisers, and fanatics.

In 2012 another abuser from Bulawayo, hiding under the a�?prophetic ministrya�? claimed that he got his healing powers from his manhood.

Many women believed him and he slept with women of every kind seeking spiritual guidance. That was until his a�?powersa�? were temporarily brought to a grinding halt after a woman whom he had administered an ointment through sex developed pimples on her private parts.

Her husband accused her of promiscuity but the woman divulged the source of her illness and pointed the finger at the prophet.
In the modern day setting particularly in Zimbabwe prophets are very powerful a�� socially that is.

They are opinion leaders, they can make a person who believe in their a�?anointinga�?A� practically do anything.A� That is where wicked elements come in because power corrupts.

Prophecy is a source of misunderstanding and confusion because itA� suffers abuse to a great extent in many churches that sprout up week in week out with catchy names.

The abuse has given it a bad name and muddied the waters for others because when a so and so prophet with a�?anointinga�? powers sexually abuses a congregant ita��s wrong, they have to face the full wrath of the law. In some cases congregants that end up on a collision course with the leader of the church, are reminded of the a�?touch not the anointeda�? catch-phrase and in the process fear is instilled.

The saddest part is that prophets like this give prophecy a bad name and cause people to be suspicious of anything of a supernatural nature. As such, prophets should not be given the elite status that they crave for.

Nowhere in the New Testament are prophets exalted to a privileged class. Paul himself said all members of the body need each other, and in his discussion of spiritual gifts in 1 Corinthians 12-14, he warns against ranking spirituality by gifting.
A real prophet does not take advantage of his congregation.