no violence

B-METRO COMMENT: Let’s treat women with respect

The abuse of women by men seems to be on the rise if press reports on various incidents of abuse are anything to go by. A�

Hardly a day passes by without reports of physical violence, emotional abuse and even sexual abuse between couples.

It is quite worrying that this abuse seems to be growing under the cover of marriage as shown by the numerous applications for protection by mainly women from their abusive husbands.

Some of the reasons for the fights verge on the laughable, but violence itself is certainly a serious matter that should be taken as such.

We believe those that fall prey to such men should let the law take its course instead of allowing their silence to perpetuate such vices.

In our previous edition, we had an article in which a woman had filed for dissolution of their union due to constant abuse from the husband.
The husband, the wife said, was in the habit of sniffing her panties each time she returned home from her chores, even nearby. He would allege that she was promiscuous and it would seem he trusted his sense of smell to pick out any possible intruders.

It seems there is a heightened sense of entitlement among such jealous men to a point where they believe their insecurity, which they think is love, overrides all other rights that the woman might have.

Also, it would seem thatA� some of the men, after paying lobola, treat their wives as their property.

This has led some people into advocating the scrapping of lobola when in actual fact payment of lobola should never and has never taken away the womana��s rights.

It is our view that the practice of lobola was a test on the son-in-law by his in-laws to see if he would be able to provide for their daughter, apart from it being a form of appreciation that they raised a woman that you later found desirable and fit to marry.

In the same edition last week, a live-in boyfriend was dragged to court by his woman for banning her from owning a cellphone as a way of limiting her communication with friends and relatives.

The abuse goes further as some men abuse their women in the bedroom in various ways.

Elsewhere in this issue we carry a story of a man who forces her wife to thank him after every sex session, a practice that has reduced their lovemaking to a ritual, and the man sees nothing wrong with demanding that.

Could it be time we introduced new ways of raising our boy child or do we need a manual on how to treat a woman. Padare/Enkundleni are you there?